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Welcome to our OBD Codes Home Where you can find codes for all of your car and trucks. We currently have a lot of Honda codes and do have a standard OBD II code list so select your OBD on the right in the menu and everything is organized there. We even have some ABS codes too! More will be added as we go! Below are new articles that we publish often.

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To find the right fix, begin your diagnosis at the air intake. Open the air box and look for blockages. A dirty air filter can trigger this code, but so could a blockage further into the intake (so be sure to trace airflow from the airbox all the way to the intake manifold). Many times, simply replacing the filter and clearing the code will resolve a P0069 in your Dodge.

However, if no problems are found and a new air filter does not do the job, then the problem is very likely in the IAT (intake air temperature) sensor.

The IAT sensor is located on the intake, and it records the temperature of the air coming into the intake manifold. If this sensor becomes faulty, it can trigger a MAP BPC and a P0069 trouble code. Replacing the IAT sensor is a relatively simple and straight-forward job, and fortunately the parts are not expensive.

NOTE: P0069 and other codes can also be triggered when an after-market chipset has been installed on a Cummins engine computer. This can cause a short or default in the system, setting off codes like P0069. If your Dodge has after-market chips installed, and if your air filter seems clean, you might try diagnosing this code by first uninstalling the non-OEM chips and resetting the system.

If you find your after-market chip is the cause of the problem, it might make sense to remove it permanently. While some after-market programmers and tools can add real power to your diesel, cheap products that promise big horsepower gains for less than $100 should probably be avoided.

After all, if the after-market could figure out a way to boost horsepower by adding a really cheap computer chip to your diesel, don't you think Dodge or Ram would be putting these chips on at the factory?

IN other words, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is.

Author Jason Lancaster is the editor of ExhaustVideos.com, a website that helps vehicle owners find the best after-market exhaust system. Jason also works with WeRMopar.com, a website that offers discounted OEM Dodge Parts online – click here for more info.

 
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