2007 VW EOS Rotor Screw Head badly drilled... How do I remove?

  • mrlemmer11
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2 months 3 weeks ago - 2 months 3 weeks ago #201342 by mrlemmer11
Good Evening All,

Here is what the Screw is supposed to look like:



And here is the one on the other side I need to remove:




Also, I'm quite certain that with only basic Youtube skills on how to replace brakes, rotors, calipers, that this caliper is pretty much shot for me and I need to replace it correct?




Lastly, all of my rotors and pads are filled with rust. My front fenders have 2 rust holes in them each. Will rust just always be a problem for me moving forward? Or will it stop if I get rust-treated rotors and what not?




Thanks in advance for any constructive replies. I'm not a mechanic by any means, I simply spend a few hours watching youtube vids when I need to do something with my car.

Cheers,
Michael
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Last edit: 2 months 3 weeks ago by mrlemmer11. Reason: Updating title based on user clarification of my problem.

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  • nightflyr
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2 months 3 weeks ago #201344 by nightflyr

You have a few options.
You could center drill the screw to the matching diameter and try using a easy out to attempt to remove the screw.
Another would be to finish drilling the head off the screw, remove the rotor then using vise grips remove the remaining length of screw from the hub.
In either case I would suggest applying heat to help with removal.

As to the caliper...
All I see as far as damage is a torn dust boot and some rust / debris.
You should research replacement dust boot for your specific vehicle and try cleaning the area with a wire brush before attempting to replace the dust boot.

Concerning your thoughts about rusting rotors...
Simply put...
You have metal, generated high heat and water / moisture... that is for 99.9% of the time = rust formation.
Rust-treated rotors may slow the process but it will win after time.
That is the nature of the beast.
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2 months 3 weeks ago #201345 by mrlemmer11

nightflyr wrote:


You have a few options.
You could center drill the screw to the matching diameter and try using a easy out to attempt to remove the screw.
Another would be to finish drilling the head off the screw, remove the rotor then using vise grips remove the remaining length of screw from the hub.
In either case I would suggest applying heat to help with removal.

Thanks, I'd been looking into the EZ out route, but hadn't thought about just getting rid of the head, pulling off the rotor and then taking it out. Was also concerned that if I jacked up the EZ out route that it would be game over for me, but again, I think I should be able to complete it should the rotor be off and I have that space with vice grips.

nightflyr wrote:
Concerning your thoughts about rusting rotors...
Simply put...
You have metal, generated high heat and water / moisture... that is for 99.9% of the time = rust formation.
Rust-treated rotors may slow the process but it will win after time.
That is the nature of the beast.

Well, not much I can say here. Your words make sense and well yeah.

nightflyr wrote:
As to the caliper...
All I see as far as damage is a torn dust boot and some rust / debris.
You should research replacement dust boot for your specific vehicle and try cleaning the area with a wire brush before attempting to replace the dust boot.

Given the limited knowledge/skills I have in this area... do you think it would just be easier/more beneficial for me in the long run to just get new reman rear calipers than to attempt to replace just the dust boot?

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2 months 3 weeks ago #201346 by nightflyr
Thanks, I'd been looking into the EZ out route, but hadn't thought about just getting rid of the head, pulling off the rotor and then taking it out. Was also concerned that if I jacked up the EZ out route that it would be game over for me, but again, I think I should be able to complete it should the rotor be off and I have that space with vice grips.
Always have a plan "B"

Well, not much I can say here. Your words make sense and well yeah.
I didn't write the rule book.. just play by it.

Given the limited knowledge/skills I have in this area...
To start with .. there is a wealth of information available on web sites and you tube all you need to to invest the time to research your specifics out.

do you think it would just be easier/more beneficial for me in the long run to just get new reman rear calipers than to attempt to replace just the dust boot?
Me personally... If I were to replace the caliper, I would replace both.
You would still need to bleed the system in either case.
But if the caliper is functioning with no issues, why spend $75.00 to $150.00 when all that is needed is a $5 - $10.00 dust boot???
That is of course that the caliper piston isn't rust damaged.
If it is rust damaged it will chew up the square O ring seal over time and begin to leak.
Again there is information available on rebuilding calipers.

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2 months 2 weeks ago #201419 by cfarber2688
as for the screws on the rotor they are there from the factory they really arent needed but it does make it easier on vws to a line the holes up right. and for the rust depends where you live. if you live where it snows rust can always be an issue. by the pictures it looks like it sat for awhile so if the car is your daily driver it wont get that bad.

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